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Lack emotional control? Try Cherry Plum Bach Flower Remedy!

Lack emotional control? Try Cherry Plum Bach Flower Remedy!

Do you lack emotional control? Are you ruled by your feelings? Does your heart rule your mind? In that case, you may need Cherry Plum Bach Flower remedy!

The negative Cherry Plum state can be quite a dangerous state of mind, and definitely one of the most horrific acute emotional mental states that can be experienced. In this state, the individual may feel as though he or she is about to lose their mind or “explode” from within, as in when one has a nervous breakdown and is unable to keep inner mechanisms going. Many fear that they will completely lose their minds and commit acts of extreme violence and do things they may regret later. Others harbour thoughts of suicide – either physically or at a mental level – and therefore, this negative emotional state is one that is looked at with great concern.

In the negative Cherry Plum state, the processes of spiritual and mental growth that occur when energies are balanced are almost frantically suppressed at a subconscious level, and the person seeks to deny the dark forces, which everyone single one of us possesses, reside in them. The person’s own terror that dark thoughts could lead to dark actions causes them to try to drive down and suppress all such thoughts. Pressure leads to counter-pressure, and this causes immense mental and emotional strain, causing the sufferer to feel as if they are headed for a nervous breakdown, with extreme fear, mental anguish and desperate thoughts being the main symptoms involved.

A person suffering from a severe negative Cherry Plum state is unable to face his or her own inner feelings and completely denies the guidance of his or her Higher Self. This personality suffers from a fundamental fear of opening up to the process of development and is literally unable to “let go”, as a result of which the negative Cherry Plum state occurs. This state can occur both as an acute and a chronic state. What causes the negative state to arise? Many factors. Take, for example, men who have fought in wars and endured days of continuous shelling. Can you imagine what happens to the will and mental state of such people? Being in the midst of constant shelling and tremendously loud noise, as well as watching their comrades die around them – the trauma can be severe and destroy one’s will, leading to a negative Cherry Plum state. Or take for example, those who have spent time in prison camps and have been under brutal interrogation for several days, even weeks. Such horrific experiences can break the will and mind of most, and such people have often developed negative Cherry Plum states.

Children in need of the Bach Flower remedy, Cherry Plum are often bed-wetters and regularly wet their beds due to a lack of control not just of their emotional nature but their urinary bladder as well. These children, who keep themselves under tight control during waking hours, let their inner anxieties come to free expression only when there is no conscious bodily control, which usually happens at night.

While often hard to recognize because the negative Cherry Plum personality exhibits extreme outward control, people experiencing the negative Cherry Plum state may be betrayed by their eyes. Often they exhibit eyes that are wide open, staring, and blinking less than normal, as if in shock.

Once in treatment with Cherry Plum Bach Flower Essence, the personality may begin to submit itself to the guidance of the Higher Self. There it can be led through the chaos of the darkness within itself to the light that is the essence of the Higher Self. After re-connecting with the Higher Self and passing through this horrendous state, these individuals are often able to bear extreme adversities that would break a lesser personality. They become strong mentally, emotionally and even at a physical level.

In the positive Cherry Plum state, one becomes able to enter deeply into the unconscious and to use the insights gained there. He or she becomes connected to a powerful reservoir of spiritual strength, gains great spiritual insight, and makes tremendous advances in personal development.

Courage To Reach Out

Courage To Reach Out

Life can be very difficult and the journey, despite what many people may convince themselves of, isn’t a road to be travelled down completely alone. Most of us are capable of enduring life’s speedbumps, hiccups and stressors effectively. We know something we face is bigger than we are able to stand up to alone, and know where to turn to for strength and support to make it past the hurdle relatively unscathed. But this isn’t the case for everyone.

For some, those same bumps can seem mountainous and overwhelming and even with support networks they know are there. Not only is this incredibly unhealthy on many levels, but it can also create an entirely different problem to deal with in addition to the root of the problem. That’s why psychotherapy is so important.

Even though there has been somewhat of a lift on the stigma of therapy over the last few years with people being brave enough to come forward to say, “Hey! I went through this thing and I went to talk to someone. Now I have tools to get through it if it comes my way again”, there is still a certain embarrassment or shame placed on that person by society for having the courage, and it is courageous, to reach out. This is so sad and disconcerting as those who don’t get psychotherapy when they need it, usually avoid it because someone around them tells them to ‘get over it’ or ‘just deal with it’. That basically ends with the individual turning to counterproductive and even self-harming ways to cope. Worst of all is losing that one person who honestly believed death was their only way out.

Psychotherapy, or counselling of any kind, is basically talking to a third party, an unbiased individual who isn’t directly involved with the situation at hand. They offer specific tools to those in need:

  • A person to talk to and listen when no one else seems to be listening or who is willing to.
  • An ear who won’t tell you what you should do, but suggest ways to see a specific situation through various angles that you may not have seen them through before.
  • They are there to give guidance, information and resources to further therapeutic paths to consider not only to help deal with the issue at hand but also any additional issues or residual effects that stem from the initial problem.
  • Psychotherapists also advise how to reduce the likelihood of the problem at hand to escalate into something bigger by breaking the problem down into ‘workable’ pieces so it can seem less overwhelming.
  • Finally, they are there to offer suggestions on how to continue to what approach works best in case the issue comes up again.

On a personal note, I have tremendous respect for individuals who reach a point they need help beyond what they can deal with on their own and seek outside help. This isn’t a sign of weakness or anything to be ashamed of. In fact, it takes great strength to admit that a problem exists and requires extra help to deal with, as well as tremendous courage to carry through and stick with it. People who live with temporary or chronic mental and psychological struggles, from what I’ve seen and experienced, are people doing everything they can to function to the best of their abilities in a world that can often seem judgmental, unforgiving and opinionated, even with situations not truly understood.

Perhaps, if we all make an effort to educate ourselves more on a certain subject we don’t know much about or an issue someone close to us is dealing with, we can then offer the support and encouragement to those who truly need it.

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Why You Should Watch Chernobyl

Why You Should Watch Chernobyl

I never planned on watching HBO’s Chernobyl. To be honest, I never knew about its existence. The only reason why I watched the show was because of a research project for my Ethics in Technologies class at university. Did I like it? Well, I wouldn’t be recommending it otherwise. For people who don’t really know about the Chernobyl disaster, I’ll give a very brief description. Chernobyl disaster was a nuclear disaster that occurred in 1986 in the Soviet Union. The disaster affected more than 5 million people around the time and is considered one of the worst nuclear disasters of all time.

Now, I need to be upfront about some things about the show. While it’s a show depicting a real-life incident, it should be assumed naturally that some parts (not all) are going to be exaggerated. It’s not scientifically the most accurate due to it being a Hollywood (HBO) production, but don’t fret because the parts that are very crucial to the accidents are depicted as realistically as possible. Due to the show being based on real-life events, I’m going to give you some spoilers but don’t worry because even with the spoilers, the show will not lose its essence for you.

Chernobyl Disaster was not just a scientific blunder. It was a mix of technical issues and unneeded politicization of sensitive technology. It not fair to educate people about such an important event without giving them more elaborate background information. The people working at the nuclear power plant and their actions (and their reasons for them) have contributed towards the occurrence of this disaster and Chernobyl does a splendid job of painting a picture with the true colours of these human actions and emotions. 

So why watch the show instead of just reading about it? The reason is simple: it makes you feel like you were witnessing the destruction firsthand and gives us a more intimate understanding of the events leading up to the disaster. I’ve seen people around me read about important events in my history class back in high school but generally, I’ve found their reactions “lacklustre”. The only time I’ve seen my classmates being moved and remembering what they read was having it being played right in front of their eyes. Reading about Auschwitz will never be the same as seeing it in pictures. There is no doubt that a live-action video would only be burned deeper into people’s minds. So, yes, watching a movie will bring us face to face with people and give a behind the scenes view of politics, lies and power struggle of people working in a nuclear power plant, the reaction of a nation struggling to maintain its image and how it affected the lives of people involved; from firefighters to local flora and fauna and more. 

The soundtrack and the cinematography for the whole shows sets a very ominous tone from the start so we know about the impending doom and it will suck you right in. I loved the acting from all the actors and the way they depicted the character’s humanity was more than enough for us to realize how much human input (not just intellectual but emotional) goes into making a disaster happen which is something that textbooks often don’t do much justice to. While I do know most people will find acting subjective, I invite people to see it for themselves and decide. What I do recommend is giving a quick read about the disaster and then jumping right in just so nobody gets lost in the scientific terms. Hopefully, the show will do a great job in connecting pieces and painting a more vivid picture of words such as lies and deceit evolving right in front of our eyes.

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On Death And Dying

On Death And Dying

One of my favourite leading men, Chadwick Boseman, died on August 28th, at the age of 43. Like the rest of the world that was not this man’s close friends or family, I learned then that he had secretly been battling with colon cancer for the past four years, all while acting in no less than seven movies, four of which were blockbuster action films. I had discovered this actor in 2013 when he had gotten his first leading role portraying the life of Jackie Robinson, the first black professional baseball player to be signed in the US in 1945, years before racial desegregation in American society was made law. This historically factual film dealt with uncomfortable subject matter, and was still a success in no small part due to this talented actor. Every film he chose from them on was always performed with such talent that audiences swallowed the “medicine with the sugar” so to speak. There was always purpose to his roles, and he executed them so well, that the message behind his films was also well received, which made them a success. To lose this black icon at such a young age, and for us not in-the know, so suddenly, felt gut-wrenching. I was floured and awash with a sense of loss, that too many have felt during 2020, at so many unexpected departures of those whose lives and/or work inspired and touched us. And I was also amazed at the mental fortitude this man must have had, in order to master a body that was in the fight of its life, and force it to flawlessly perform in extremely physically demanding roles. All while juggling surgeries, and chemotherapy that would leave most people unable to do much more than hang on, instead of work the way he did. He created a body of work that is both dramatic, comedic, and powerful, all while probably being the sickest he’d ever been. One of the roles he is best known for is that of King Tchalla in the graphic novel turned blockbuster film “Black Panther.’

This feature tells the story of the unconquered African nation of Wakanda, that has much more advanced technology than the rest of the world due to their apt use of an element from a comet that can only be found there, called vibranium. This motion picture has a mostly black cast, crew, director, strong female leads, etc., as well as a blockbuster budget, and a great storyline. It also focuses on a black superhero, and a proud African civilization, that is self-sufficient, stylish, and, of course, kicks some serious ass when the bad guys show up. The main protagonist of this movie was Chadwick Boseman, an African-American actor who spoke with an African accent throughout the film to further the notion that not even the speech of the king of this nation had been conquered. When in real life, the children of most dignitaries of foreign countries are given a British or American education to prepare them for international acceptance on a world stage. So rejecting this fact, even in a fictional film, was just another detail that shocked, awed, and conquered black audiences worldwide, making this all-black motion picture with no derogatory stereotypes, the highest-grossing film of 2018.

Despite the fact that the African nations, part of this feature film’s audience either lives in or are from have all been colonized physically in the past, and are still economically beggared to this day by their ex-colonist nations. This feature made us proud of being African, of being from these real traditions that were now gloriously portrayed on the big screen. And we all were able to see in colour what might have been (superhero aspect aside), had colonization not occurred and endured. Causing for those who stayed to be privy to their countries’ persistent fall, and for those who wanted a better life for their children, to immigrate elsewhere. Leading to the racial and systemic inequities our displaced brothers and sisters live in today. But on a deeper level, those of African descent whose ancestors were forced into slavery in America, Canada, and the Caribbean, also felt that black pride. This African-American actor who learned South African dialect for the role, and insisted on speaking with an accurate Xhosa accent, became himself a visual bridge of unity with the homeland that their ancestors were forced to leave. His performance communicated the shared dream of ‘what could have been’ for them as well. African—hyphenated other nations became plain African, a unity that has not been ours mentally since the advent of colonization. I can’t help but wonder at the foresight of this man, to understand so thoroughly the possible vehicle for change via entertainment that he was taking part in. With, the rendering of a blockbuster flick full of black people which for once was fully staffed and moulded through a black lens, with personal understanding of a black audience. Not as receivers of racial and stereotypical tropes, but as viewers that are to be respected, engaged, and inspired. We were treated as if this feature film was not the first of its kind, when, for all the aforementioned reasons, it was.

Movies, TV shows, and documentaries often do more to move the sensibilities of regular people, than sometimes years of social activism does. I think this explains the outrage that occurs when watch videos of police brutality and murder of black and brown folks. The very same events have been occurring without video footage since slavery was abolished in America 155 years ago. But, when we see visual footage of the stories we may hear briefly about on the news, radio, or read online, it automatically hits us differently. We aren’t yet immune to the emotions those images bring forth. There is no spinning what our eyes witness, there is just horrific action and our reaction to it. We see someone be hurt by those we do not want to believe to be capable of doing that to us. Not with the trust, funding, and power over life and death they have been given in society. Then we read the spin, and our eyes can’t unsee what we have. As citizens, we either pretend that we’re convinced that a wrong is really a right, or look away and close our eyes to that which does not directly affect us. Or gloriously, we choose to be awake, aware, and brave enough to risk whatever privilege we currently hold, to take part in demanding this social change.

I think that the positive fictional visualization of a powerful, and justly led black nation, by black persons in every corner of the globe in 2018, showed us images we also cannot unsee. It created a feeling of unity that, along with the lack of social distractions due to the pandemic, led to a worldwide reaction of outrage when seeing the video of the death of George Floyd this summer. This renewed global spark for the Black Lives Matter movement and international call for an end to systemic racism, and police brutality is the largest activism demonstration in US history. In the US alone, it is estimated that between 15 and 26 million persons had participated in protests within 30 days. We know that the rest of the world also demonstrated, led by black community groups, and their non-black allies. Not just in solidarity to the murder of George Floyd, but also to protest the deaths of black community members at the hands of the police in every country where a black population exists. This fight we hope will be won in the US, but every black community is fighting for those same rights where they reside, and that is why large demonstrations have not happened only in the United States.

I believe this motion picture which was carried by the brilliant actor Chadwick Boseman has played a pivotal role in setting the stage for this historic domino effect of social activism. Such a pressure for concrete change on governments hasn’t been felt since the days of the original civil rights movement led on one side by Dr. Martin Luther King, and on the other by Malcom X. I pray that we are in a pivotal moment of history, where these black lives that keep being taken by law enforcement (and have continued unabated since the death of George Floyd), will be prevented by legal means at every level of government worldwide. Rest in power Chadwick Boseman, thank you for being a real-life superhero, and leading by example in your personal work ethic and absolute courage while facing possible death. As well as for leaving us with movies that have praised our black icons, and lit a dormant spark in our hearts of what we have yet to become as black people.

                                                            An original blog written by

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An Overabundance Of Fear

An Overabundance Of Fear

Without meaning to, every piece I seem to write on this platform discusses what is for me, a serious issue. From blogs pertaining to mental health and physical disability, to ones about Covid-19, systemic racism and police brutality. This is not done on purpose, and every time I transcribe I try to prove to myself that I am able to broach less serious topics. Or at least write about topics I feel strongly about more superficially. Somehow this never happens; instead I always seem to delve deep, and run a bit long with every article, without ever reaching that cool, un-inflamed journalistic voice in my prose, which I actually aim for. Unconsciously I guess I want each blog I pen to make a reader look at their more privileged upbringing, gender, race, economic class, and/or democratic country of residence, etc., and call into question how much of their viewpoint was shaped by this. How others who may not have had the same advantages growing up may accordingly, think and behave differently. For the length of the think piece, I almost try to enact a mental “Freaky Friday” with the readers, and ask them to view the world through a more disadvantaged lens. I am very grateful that I live in a country that allows me the freedom to do so.

Another reason that I do not write this way is because this has not been my life experience so far. Although I am lucky enough to reside in a democratic nation without wars being fought on its soils, and with a supposed-stable economic future for all Canadians who apply themselves, and work in accordance with our capitalistic system. At least this was the narrative Canadians were fed via our media, non-post-secondary education, and governments, pre-Covid. Other than recessions and a slightly unstable U.S. presidency that we all worry about, as a Canadian I am aware that I am privileged just on the basis of living in a G7 country. Post-Covid I am also privileged to have a government that has reacted in a way as to pre-emptively protect its population. The Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB), which supports regular citizens like me, has been in place since March 15, 2020, and has been extended another 4 weeks recently, making it 28 weeks (or 7 months) of financial governmental support. This is meant to ensure that citizens are not hit as hard by this pandemic financially as certain parts of Europe, Africa, India, the Middle East, and the U.S. have been. It allows us the collective luxury of social distancing en masse while continuing to take care of our families and ourselves. Even if pre-Covid some of us did not work in jobs that allowed us to work from home, most Canadians have been home for months trying to keep other Canadians safe. So, despite being a woman of colour, and dwelling in a mostly wonderful country where unfortunately my life and that of those who look like me, is not valued equally, I will endeavour to write from that privileged perspective nonetheless. Here goes.

Text Box:  Illustration 2: by Choconstant on Instagram (with artist permission)I would like to talk about fear. Fear of what we want our lives to be, professionally, personally, and of what we are afraid to attempt to bring into existence. In case, we are not as gifted in that which impassions us as we wish we were. So instead of doing our best to reach our goals, make our dreams real, and bypass any fantasy life we ever daydreamed about for ourselves, we just stay stuck. Striving for objectives, we know we can accomplish, instead of the real ambitions we want to attain. Speaking of myself, I am scared to death of my potential. Of learning the limits of my abilities in the fields of work that I dream of making my mark in. What if the wonderful words of the novelists that have opened up my mind, and emboldened my soul are light years from any literary output I could ever produce? What if a 9-to-5 entry-level job, taking orders is the most I can do to be a contributing member of society? What if I try my hardest and fail at being more than what I currently am, and it breaks me? These are some of the questions I have been haunted by, in the past few years of my life. I have several chronic illnesses, I am a visible minority in a blatantly unfair world, and I come from a difficult family. Basically, my daily life is a struggle in itself, so I have been able to avoid the challenge of giving my imagination flight as an adult. Somehow as a child, and adolescent and even as a late teen, dreaming and trying to live the life I envisioned for myself was easier to do. After so many years, it’s hard to tell myself to keep striving, but it is even harder on me not to do so.

This pandemic is calling a multitude of things into question for me, and for millions of others, as can be attested to in terms of the heightened social activism worldwide in 2020. The world we live in, the injustices we are accustomed to looking away from, and accepting as normal. The death of so many people in less than six months, and to be honest absolutely no certainty of what the future holds for any of us (living in G7 countries or not). The lack of social distractions due to the pandemic, and the spotlight on what an esteemed place fear has in my life is sobering for me. How I allow myself to be governed by it, rather than facing it and finding ways to, regardless of my environment, disabilities, race, or gender, be more than what I already know myself to be capable of. I have a safe environment, the financial cushion of my government, and the opportunity to do something with my time that enriches others not just myself. How dare I not test the limits of what I can be, what I can do, and try to leave something behind that isn’t self-serving and nihilistic? How dare I not trust that if I fall down, I will get back up, as I have countless times in the past? Maybe all I am, and have been through was meant to lead me to being better than the person I may have become otherwise. And maybe that person is supposed to continuously fight her own fears, to be part of the change I write and dream about. On a societal-level, personally, and professionally.

I invite anyone who reads this blog, who like me is questioning so much regarding themselves and their society, to not feel overwhelmed, or helpless. The people who inspire us were just like us once, they felt strongly about something, and they were afraid, but in the end they refused to let that stop them from inciting change. From creating vehicles for advancement of their causes, and from reaching for their dreams with everything they had. They did not hide behind excuses, or systemic circumstances, they chose to be trailblazers, and to break glass ceilings along the way. I see you fear, and I choose not to let you take the wheel any longer.

                                                            An original blog written by

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